WILDCAT IS THE OUTRAGE?? Satanic Scotland

IS THE OUTRAGE??

IS THE OUTRAGE??

Satanic Scotland

scotland-fire.gif
Real History Of Satanism  Lyndon LaRouche 17-01-05

image


National Records of Scotland – Scotland

imagen n


imageSCOTLAND
must realise that ritual and satanic abuse is a very real and growing
problem whatever the outcome of the Orkney inquiry, a child abuse expert
warned in Glasgow yesterday.

American Dr Judianne Densen-Gerber, an
authority on ritualistic abuse and the link with alcohol and drug use,
told the International Congress on Drug and Alcohol Dependence that
these types of abuses were increasing worldwide. Her studies have found
that alcohol or drug dependency has been present in patients involved in
the abuses. Dr Densen-Gerber, 57, a forensic psychiatrist, doctor, and
lawyer, said the problem was particularly acute in America. She
described some of the patients she has treated over the years, including
a Yale University student who she said had eaten three of her children
on a

cult altar. For anyone in the audience
who might have thought satanism did not exist, she said the taxi driver
who brought her to the Royal Concert Hall yesterday had claimed to be a
satanist.

”The taxi driver asked me on
the way over what I was talking about and when I told him he said: ‘I’m a
practising satanist.’ So don’t tell me there aren’t any because I was
driven here by one.”

Dr Densen-Gerber said later: ”There is no question that in the Western world we have an increase in ritualistic, satanic crime.”
She said there were many reasons for the rise, including the feelings
of powerlessness stemming from a recession. ”In time of recession we
have an increase of Ku Klux Klan activity and it is very easy to go from
the Klan mentality to ritualism.” She said some of her patients had
been members of a 3000-strong coven, two large cults were known to have
their headquarters in Geneva and Venice, and some cults were believed to
have targeted day-care institutions in the US. ”We’re not talking about small groups. They are highly organised with

dual ministries, often fronted behind more traditional religions.”
She said one particularly worrying aspect of satanism and ritual abuse
throughout the world was the similarity between rituals. Dr
Densen-Gerber said she has been following the Orkney allegations very
closely and was looking forward to studying the report. The conference
was also told yesterday that Scotland’s level of services for alcoholics
was an international disgrace. Mr Peter McCann, chairman of the
country’s largest treatment clinic at Castle Craig in Peebleshire, said
the Government and health boards would have to carry out a radical
re-appraisal of specialist services to bring them to levels enjoyed in
other parts of the world. He warned the Scottish Office that services
would need to be expanded quickly if they were to meet their target of
reducing Scottish alcoholism deaths by the year 2000. Mr McCann said
Scotland had 390 specialist beds including those in the private and
charitable sector. This compares to 2620 beds in Norway and 952 beds in
Alberta where the problem is similar to Scotland, but the population is
half the size. Delegates will hear today how drug addicts in 12 cities
throughout the world, including Glasgow, are flouting safe sex
guidelines. The study found that most addicts in all of the cities were
sexually active but did not wear condoms. The conference will also study
the link between substance abuse and crime, and will hear how Japan has
managed to control abuse.

http://ift.tt/2bcyhHl

http://ift.tt/1uOrR8B


Orkney: South Ronaldsay child abuse scandal

In 1990-1991 nine children suspected of
being sexually abused by their families and an alleged child abuse ring
were removed by social services in Orkney. The abuse was also alleged to
involve “ritualistic elements”. The parents approached the media and
made the case national and international news. In April 1991,
a sheriff ruled that the evidence was seriously flawed and the children
were returned home.

In June, social services appealed the
sheriff’s ruling but the appeal was overturned and an official inquiry
was established in August 1991, which after 9 months’ investigation at a
cost of £6 million, published its report in October 1992. It described
the dismissal of the first judgment as “most unfortunate” and criticized
all those involved, including the social workers, the police, and the
Orkney Islands Council. Social workers’ training, methods, and judgment
were given special condemnation, and the report stated that the concept
of “ritual abuse” was “not only unwarrantable at present but may affect
the objectivity of practitioners and parents”. A 1994 government report
based on three years of research found that there was no foundation to
any of the Satanic abuse claims.

Satanic Ritual Abuse. The Orkney Story

Orkney social work boss is hounded out of islands in anti-gay hate


Lewis

In 2003 allegations by three children
in Lewis, Scotland resulted in the arrest of eight people for sexual
abuse occurring between 1990 and 2000. A 2005 investigation by the
Social Work Inspection Agency found extensive evidence of sexual,
physical and emotional abuse and neglect.Police investigation resulted
in allegations of an island-wide “Satanic paedophile ring” though
charges were dropped nine months later following an inconclusive
investigation

A key witness who had implicated her
family in the abuse and whose evidence was “vital” to the case of
satanic abuse recanted her testimony in 2006[55][56] and the media
raised questions about the nature of the police interviewing techniques.
with a police spokesperson replying that the witness was questioned
appropriately and that allegations were made by numerous witnesses.

http://ift.tt/2bcx9n7

Girls to launch own ‘sex abuse’ prosecution  Oct 10th 2005


image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image


http://ift.tt/1OfslvI


Tots `killed’ in Satan orgies

PAEDOPHILE rings in Britain are carrying
out Satanic rituals during child sex orgies, a leading psy-
chotherapist claimed yesterday.

Valerie Sinason revealed dozens of her patients had described being drugged and watching adults and babies killed.

She said: “We are talking about necrophilia, bestiality and sadomasochistic acts. Basically every perversion which is out.”

Photographs showed children with horrific injuries and remains of mutilated animals at ceremonial sites, Ms Sinason added.

And an alleged victim, 27, told Radio
4’s Today programme yesterday: “There are children born for the purpose
of sacrifice who would be kept until their time came.

“They would be put in cages and some couldn’t talk or walk.”

Ms Sinason, the director of the Clinic
for Dissociative Studies, said the Fred West case showed people could be
dead when nobody even knew they were missing.

Scotland Yard is carrying out its own inquiry into Satanic abuse and last night said it took the findings “extremely seriously”.

SOURCE THE MIRROR Feb 10th 2000

this is at the age of 14 years that Satan came to her


Satanic killers tell of blood drinking rites  by Hannah Cleaver in Berlin  18 Jan 2002

A WOMAN who says she
and her husband killed a German friend with 66 knife wounds on orders
from the devil has claimed that she became a satanist in Britain

Read in full here The Telegraph


WATCH

Where Angels Fear: Ritual Abuse In Scotland By Laurie Matthew

Dundee charity reveals terrible toll of ritual sexual abuse 


Black magic high priest jailed for sexually abusing boys

‘Black Magic’ Child Abuser Jailed

A former police officer who claimed he
was a “black magic” high priest while sexually abusing three children
has been jailed for seven years. John McFadden, 42, from Bearsden, was
found guilty of abusing a boy between 1988 and 1992 in Kirkintilloch. He
was also convicted of abusing two other youngsters at various addresses
in Kirkintilloch between 1983 and 1990. At the High Court in Glasgow,
judge Lord Matthews also placed McFadden on the sex offenders register.

He befriended the boy,
invited him to stay overnight and told him that demons and spirits would
kill him and drag him to hell unless he carried out sex acts. He
dressed in a black cloak and used a crucifix with a skull and crossbones
and an onyx ring, which he claimed gave him power, to terrify the
youngster into keeping the abuse a secret.

The victim said: He
started to get us into this black magic. He described himself as a high
priest with this black magic circle. He said he could have out of body
experiences and could talk to demons and spirits. One day he said he was
going to initiate me into the circle and this became the main driver
for my silence. He had a cast iron bowl and he pricked my finger and put
some blood in it, then he took some of my hair and said that he had to
have some of my semen and then it all had to be burned.”

John McFadden told one of his victims – a
12-year-old boy – that demons and spirits would kill him and his
parents and drag them to hell unless he carried out vile sex acts.

“I had to be naked and he had
to be naked with this black cloak over him. I was thinking ‘this isn’t
right’ but I was told that if I was to speak out me and my mum and dad
would be killed and sent to hell. I was terrified. I basically went home
and just cried.”

SOUNDS CONVINCING HUH!
Indeed it does, this appalling case sounds as though it might have been
created by SRA believers to portray every claim they have ever made and
‘prove’ the existence of Satanic Ritual Abuse. All their manic motifs
are so contiguous in this report that they must have been salivating at
the prospect.

  • Trafficking with Demons and Spirits
  • The wearing of Black Robes
  • An Abominated Crucifix
  • Human Skull and Bones
  • A Magic Ring to Compel Others
  • Claims of Being a Black Magic High-Priest who could have out of body experiences
  • The drawing of blood within a Black Magic Circle
  • The use of semen in a Cast Iron Cauldron

Clearly an open and shut case?  Read in full HERE


YOUNG MUMS TURNING TO WITCHCRAFT; Scots women behind occult craze Sept 9th 2001

THOUSANDS of Scots women are ditching Christianity to take up witchcraft.

Experts say there are around 10,000 witches in Scotland – 10 times as many as a decade ago.

Many are young mothers and professional women, who prefer spell-making and sorcery to keep-fit classes.

Cult TV programmes such as Sabrina the
Teenage Witch, which stars Melissa Joan Hart, are changing the image of
Britain’s oldest religion.

The rise of satanic singer Marilyn Manson has also led to a new generation of people dabbling with the occult.

And with the first Harry Potter film due for release in November, the popularity of witchcraft is set to soar.

The Pagan Federation claims magistrates, doctors, policewomen and lawyers are turning to the occult.

Mum-of-three Christine Quick, 42, of Aberdour, Fife, is a practising witch.

She has her own website –
greenwitch.co.uk – and runs a shop, Mystique Moments, in the village,
selling potions for love, astral travel and eczema.

Christine believes she is a reincarnation of a witch who was drowned in the Forth 1000 years ago.

She said: “They tied her to a pole and waited for the tide to come in. I’ve always hated water.”

Blonde Christine finds it amusing when
people expect her to look like their idea of a witch, complete with
broomstick and pointed hat.

She said: “When people in Aberdour found out what I am, they were shocked. People came up to me and said, ‘You just can’t be a witch – you’re so normal.’ They
expect witches to be bad – but I’m good. In a pub one day, a man
insulted me. The whole place went quiet. They were all waiting for him
to go up in a puff of smoke.”

Christine says an increasing number of her customers are professional women.

She said: “I get a
lot of teachers and nurses. They travel up to 100 miles to visit me
because they can’t be seen to be witches in their own community. There
is still a lot of shame and people do point the finger.”

Latest research shows 41 per cent of Scots do not identify with any religion – up from 29 per cent in 1983.

Last week, the leader of the Catholic Church in England and Wales said Christianity is near to being “vanquished” in Britain.

Cardinal Cormac Murphy-O’Connor, the Archbishop of Westminster, said people had turned to New Age practices rather than to God.

But last night, Andy Norfolk, of the Pagan Federation, said many people have a misguided notion of paganism.

He said: “There are an awful lot of us about. We don’t all look unusual, with hooked noses or warty features. Witchcraft is a serious, nature-based mystery religion in which the natural world is seen to be sacred.”

The federation has 5000 active members, a tenfold growth in the last decade.

Mr Norfolk added: “There are at least 10,000 witches in Scotland.”

On Thursday evening, STV and Grampian
will broadcast This Scotland – Witches of Prestwick, which contains
interviews with witches, including a teacher, business-woman, student
and bio- technician.
source


Orkney, Ayrshire, Cleveland … will the authorities ever learn about child sexual abuse cases?

Those
questions were brought into sharp focus by Jean Rafferty’s powerful,
outspoken piece in The National on the Orkney and Ayrshire sexual abuse
cases, and on the censorship of open discussion about them (When evil visited Orkney, February 27).
It was published on the 25th anniversary of the day nine children, from
four middle-class families, were taken into care on South Ronaldsay,
Orkney, in 1991. This happened after children from a large,
disadvantaged family spoke of an organised sex abuse ring there.
Just like
the eight Ayrshire children removed into care in 1990, they were
returned home: in Ayrshire, after a judge reversed an earlier judge’s
decision, and in Orkney by a sheriff before the evidence was even
tested. It never has been tested. In both cases, allegations included
sadistic ritual and occult practices against children, allegations
much-ridiculed ever since.
The cases
remain important, and I believe the evidence now needs to be reassessed,
for at least three reasons. First, a stream of shocking failures to
protect children from sexual abuse, in the Churches, in care homes, in
private home cellars, through sexual exploitation gangs, by media
celebrities and the powerful, has recently been exposed and continues to
be. This has increased Government and public concern for abused
children and commitment to protect them; and has made society less
inclined to dismiss forms of abuse they previously found unbelievable.
Secondly,
like Rafferty I and others have over 25 years tried to publicise
suggestive evidence that children were indeed in danger. Particularly
over the Orkney case, we have tried to correct untruths – in print, on
the BBC, in documentaries and online – and point up the flaws in the
endlessly recycled and invented theories by supporters of accused
adults, who allege it was just “satanic panic”. We were repeatedly
unsuccessful.
The time is
surely overdue to end a silencing and misrepresentation which sees, for
example, not a single neutral, factual report of either case anywhere
publicly available on the internet. By publishing Rafferty’s article,
The National has stood out for its courage and independence.
Thirdly –
and I believe most important – the verdicts and the myth-making after
these cases have for decades negatively influenced public attitudes,
professional child protection behaviour, and child protection law.
They have
fuelled suspicion of social workers and paediatricians, increased stress
in child protection work, ruled out investigation of possible ritual
organised abuse, strengthened beliefs that children fantasise about
abuse, openly tightened legislation and practice to make it harder to
protect children at serious risk, and eaten into professional courage.
That encourages timidity, a professional watch-my-back mentality, and
nervousness about investigating sexual abuse.
Child sexual
abuse cases have increasingly disappeared off the statutory child
protection radar.Teachers, youth workers, children’s panel members and
social workers still mention Orkney as a reason not to ask a child if
anyone has harmed them sexually, however disturbing or suggestive signs
and behaviours may be. “The Orkney report said we mustn’t – didn’t it?”
(Actually: no it did not.)
An outspoken
Social Work Inspection Agency inquiry report in 2005, into the
scandalous failure to act over many years in Western Isles (Eilean Saar)
despite 222 expressions of concern and numerous case conferences about
three abused and seriously maltreated girls, made this comment. “New
legislation (the Children (Scotland) Act 1995) was designed to protect
children within the context of partnership with their parents. This,
together with the aftermath of the Orkney inquiry (1992) may have
contributed to the prolonged attempts to engage with the family: rather
than to try to remove all three children”.
Did the
authorities behave wisely in the ways they pursued their suspicions in
Orkney? On several counts, no – and today they would surely be less
precipitate, collecting evidence for longer, less obtrusively and in
ways less reliant on the children themselves. Do official mistakes mean
that there was no abuse? Absolutely not: the two issues are separate,
yet they are always conflated.
Was there
suggestive, alarming evidence of organised sexual abuse? Yes, in both
Orkney and Ayrshire. And if the assumed outcomes of the Orkney or
Ayrshire cases are incorrect, then the future lessons drawn from them –
like caution and timidity against sexual abuse, deference and apology to
articulate adults – need revising too.
In this I do
not think we should get tied into angry arguments of great endlessness,
about whether these two cases “really” involved satanist abuse, and if
satanist abuse “really” exists. (It does, but as a cult of human beings –
not evil spirits flying over our homes.) The more important, wider
question is whether there were seriously abused children in these two
places who were failed, who were never protected. And whether there have
been many more children, ever since child protection authorities had
their fingers so badly burned.
Finally,
like the Cleveland Report in 1989, the Orkney Inquiry was commissioned
to examine the conduct of the authorities: not to examine risks to
children. I believe that any future inquiries following high-profile
cases can neither benefit nor protect children at risk, nor be truly
child-centred, unless they include this question in their remit: were
the actual children at the heart of this case abused or not?
How could that not be the most important question to ask?
Sarah Nelson is a research specialist on child sexual abuse issues, based at Edinburgh University The National

Witches `rife in Inverness’  Feb 9th 1998

A Highland minister stunned his flock yesterday by claiming a witches’ coven is active in his parish. 

The Rev John Butcher said a local lawyer and doctor were part of the Satan-worshipping sect. 

He made his stunning claims to a packed congregation at the Ness Bank Church in Inverness. 

Around 250 shocked parishioners listened as the minister warned youngsters to beware of witches and devil- worshippers. 

After his service the retired minister, standing in for a colleague, said:

“I raised the matter
of satanic rites being conducted locally to warn the congregation,
especially younger members, that such practices were totally against the
teachings of the Bible.
I have
absolutely no reason to doubt what I was told about the coven operating
in and around Inverness. I am sure that my informant was being quite
honest with me. 
I had to balance the
risk of unnecessarily giving publicity to these people who dabble in
evil spirits against my desire to ensure other people weren’t enticed
into that kind of mumbo- jumbo. 
The
purpose for choosing this sermon was to make it clear that evil spirits
were not just something found in Biblical times, but that these are
around us today. 
People who dabble in the occult are affected by evil spirits, the antithesis of the true teachings of Our Lord.” Source



If you go down the woods today…beware the Blair Sticks Daily Record Aug 1st 2015

EDINBURGH dog walkers are getting the creeps from pagan festival-style dolls strung up on trees around a campfire.
WATCH VIDEO..

//players.brightcove.net/4221396001/0f4f7561-90a6-49c1-9d85-e357b5f91a26_default/index.html?videoId=4389502501001

SPOOKY wooden dolls left hanging in trees are giving dog walkers the creeps at a popular Scots beauty spot.
The stick figures, like those in horror movie The Blair Witch Project, have appeared in the woods at Cammo Estate near Edinburgh .
There are eight of them, placed in a circle around the remains of a large fire.BLAIR
The stick figures are reminiscent of something from the Blair Witch Project.

One walker said: “At first I thought it was a kid who had done them. But
looking at how everything has been placed within a circle, it looks
like a protection thing. I find it quite spooky and a bit unsettling. It
could be something to do with a pagan ritual.”

Another added: “It might have something to do with midsummer but I don’t feel very comfortable staying around to see what it’s all about.”
Practising witch Pauline Reid, high priestess of the Hearth Coven in Glasgow, said the figures could be linked to the pagan Lammas festival, which takes place today. Daily Record


ALEISTER CROWLEY


UK Column Live – Satanic Ritual Abuse | UK Column

scotland-fire.gif
Real History Of Satanism  Lyndon LaRouche 17-01-05

image


National Records of Scotland – Scotland

imagen n


imageSCOTLAND
must realise that ritual and satanic abuse is a very real and growing
problem whatever the outcome of the Orkney inquiry, a child abuse expert
warned in Glasgow yesterday.

American Dr Judianne Densen-Gerber, an
authority on ritualistic abuse and the link with alcohol and drug use,
told the International Congress on Drug and Alcohol Dependence that
these types of abuses were increasing worldwide. Her studies have found
that alcohol or drug dependency has been present in patients involved in
the abuses. Dr Densen-Gerber, 57, a forensic psychiatrist, doctor, and
lawyer, said the problem was particularly acute in America. She
described some of the patients she has treated over the years, including
a Yale University student who she said had eaten three of her children
on a

cult altar. For anyone in the audience
who might have thought satanism did not exist, she said the taxi driver
who brought her to the Royal Concert Hall yesterday had claimed to be a
satanist.

”The taxi driver asked me on
the way over what I was talking about and when I told him he said: ‘I’m a
practising satanist.’ So don’t tell me there aren’t any because I was
driven here by one.”

Dr Densen-Gerber said later: ”There is no question that in the Western world we have an increase in ritualistic, satanic crime.”
She said there were many reasons for the rise, including the feelings
of powerlessness stemming from a recession. ”In time of recession we
have an increase of Ku Klux Klan activity and it is very easy to go from
the Klan mentality to ritualism.” She said some of her patients had
been members of a 3000-strong coven, two large cults were known to have
their headquarters in Geneva and Venice, and some cults were believed to
have targeted day-care institutions in the US. ”We’re not talking about small groups. They are highly organised with

dual ministries, often fronted behind more traditional religions.”
She said one particularly worrying aspect of satanism and ritual abuse
throughout the world was the similarity between rituals. Dr
Densen-Gerber said she has been following the Orkney allegations very
closely and was looking forward to studying the report. The conference
was also told yesterday that Scotland’s level of services for alcoholics
was an international disgrace. Mr Peter McCann, chairman of the
country’s largest treatment clinic at Castle Craig in Peebleshire, said
the Government and health boards would have to carry out a radical
re-appraisal of specialist services to bring them to levels enjoyed in
other parts of the world. He warned the Scottish Office that services
would need to be expanded quickly if they were to meet their target of
reducing Scottish alcoholism deaths by the year 2000. Mr McCann said
Scotland had 390 specialist beds including those in the private and
charitable sector. This compares to 2620 beds in Norway and 952 beds in
Alberta where the problem is similar to Scotland, but the population is
half the size. Delegates will hear today how drug addicts in 12 cities
throughout the world, including Glasgow, are flouting safe sex
guidelines. The study found that most addicts in all of the cities were
sexually active but did not wear condoms. The conference will also study
the link between substance abuse and crime, and will hear how Japan has
managed to control abuse.

http://ift.tt/2bcyhHl

http://ift.tt/1uOrR8B


Orkney: South Ronaldsay child abuse scandal

In 1990-1991 nine children suspected of
being sexually abused by their families and an alleged child abuse ring
were removed by social services in Orkney. The abuse was also alleged to
involve “ritualistic elements”. The parents approached the media and
made the case national and international news. In April 1991,
a sheriff ruled that the evidence was seriously flawed and the children
were returned home.

In June, social services appealed the
sheriff’s ruling but the appeal was overturned and an official inquiry
was established in August 1991, which after 9 months’ investigation at a
cost of £6 million, published its report in October 1992. It described
the dismissal of the first judgment as “most unfortunate” and criticized
all those involved, including the social workers, the police, and the
Orkney Islands Council. Social workers’ training, methods, and judgment
were given special condemnation, and the report stated that the concept
of “ritual abuse” was “not only unwarrantable at present but may affect
the objectivity of practitioners and parents”. A 1994 government report
based on three years of research found that there was no foundation to
any of the Satanic abuse claims.

Satanic Ritual Abuse. The Orkney Story

Orkney social work boss is hounded out of islands in anti-gay hate


Lewis

In 2003 allegations by three children
in Lewis, Scotland resulted in the arrest of eight people for sexual
abuse occurring between 1990 and 2000. A 2005 investigation by the
Social Work Inspection Agency found extensive evidence of sexual,
physical and emotional abuse and neglect.Police investigation resulted
in allegations of an island-wide “Satanic paedophile ring” though
charges were dropped nine months later following an inconclusive
investigation

A key witness who had implicated her
family in the abuse and whose evidence was “vital” to the case of
satanic abuse recanted her testimony in 2006[55][56] and the media
raised questions about the nature of the police interviewing techniques.
with a police spokesperson replying that the witness was questioned
appropriately and that allegations were made by numerous witnesses.

http://ift.tt/2bcx9n7

Girls to launch own ‘sex abuse’ prosecution  Oct 10th 2005


image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image


http://ift.tt/1OfslvI


Tots `killed’ in Satan orgies

PAEDOPHILE rings in Britain are carrying
out Satanic rituals during child sex orgies, a leading psy-
chotherapist claimed yesterday.

Valerie Sinason revealed dozens of her patients had described being drugged and watching adults and babies killed.

She said: “We are talking about necrophilia, bestiality and sadomasochistic acts. Basically every perversion which is out.”

Photographs showed children with horrific injuries and remains of mutilated animals at ceremonial sites, Ms Sinason added.

And an alleged victim, 27, told Radio
4’s Today programme yesterday: “There are children born for the purpose
of sacrifice who would be kept until their time came.

“They would be put in cages and some couldn’t talk or walk.”

Ms Sinason, the director of the Clinic
for Dissociative Studies, said the Fred West case showed people could be
dead when nobody even knew they were missing.

Scotland Yard is carrying out its own inquiry into Satanic abuse and last night said it took the findings “extremely seriously”.

SOURCE THE MIRROR Feb 10th 2000

this is at the age of 14 years that Satan came to her


Satanic killers tell of blood drinking rites  by Hannah Cleaver in Berlin  18 Jan 2002

A WOMAN who says she
and her husband killed a German friend with 66 knife wounds on orders
from the devil has claimed that she became a satanist in Britain

Read in full here The Telegraph


WATCH

Where Angels Fear: Ritual Abuse In Scotland By Laurie Matthew

Dundee charity reveals terrible toll of ritual sexual abuse 


Black magic high priest jailed for sexually abusing boys

‘Black Magic’ Child Abuser Jailed

A former police officer who claimed he
was a “black magic” high priest while sexually abusing three children
has been jailed for seven years. John McFadden, 42, from Bearsden, was
found guilty of abusing a boy between 1988 and 1992 in Kirkintilloch. He
was also convicted of abusing two other youngsters at various addresses
in Kirkintilloch between 1983 and 1990. At the High Court in Glasgow,
judge Lord Matthews also placed McFadden on the sex offenders register.

He befriended the boy,
invited him to stay overnight and told him that demons and spirits would
kill him and drag him to hell unless he carried out sex acts. He
dressed in a black cloak and used a crucifix with a skull and crossbones
and an onyx ring, which he claimed gave him power, to terrify the
youngster into keeping the abuse a secret.

The victim said: He
started to get us into this black magic. He described himself as a high
priest with this black magic circle. He said he could have out of body
experiences and could talk to demons and spirits. One day he said he was
going to initiate me into the circle and this became the main driver
for my silence. He had a cast iron bowl and he pricked my finger and put
some blood in it, then he took some of my hair and said that he had to
have some of my semen and then it all had to be burned.”

John McFadden told one of his victims – a
12-year-old boy – that demons and spirits would kill him and his
parents and drag them to hell unless he carried out vile sex acts.

“I had to be naked and he had
to be naked with this black cloak over him. I was thinking ‘this isn’t
right’ but I was told that if I was to speak out me and my mum and dad
would be killed and sent to hell. I was terrified. I basically went home
and just cried.”

SOUNDS CONVINCING HUH!
Indeed it does, this appalling case sounds as though it might have been
created by SRA believers to portray every claim they have ever made and
‘prove’ the existence of Satanic Ritual Abuse. All their manic motifs
are so contiguous in this report that they must have been salivating at
the prospect.

  • Trafficking with Demons and Spirits
  • The wearing of Black Robes
  • An Abominated Crucifix
  • Human Skull and Bones
  • A Magic Ring to Compel Others
  • Claims of Being a Black Magic High-Priest who could have out of body experiences
  • The drawing of blood within a Black Magic Circle
  • The use of semen in a Cast Iron Cauldron

Clearly an open and shut case?  Read in full HERE


YOUNG MUMS TURNING TO WITCHCRAFT; Scots women behind occult craze Sept 9th 2001

THOUSANDS of Scots women are ditching Christianity to take up witchcraft.

Experts say there are around 10,000 witches in Scotland – 10 times as many as a decade ago.

Many are young mothers and professional women, who prefer spell-making and sorcery to keep-fit classes.

Cult TV programmes such as Sabrina the
Teenage Witch, which stars Melissa Joan Hart, are changing the image of
Britain’s oldest religion.

The rise of satanic singer Marilyn Manson has also led to a new generation of people dabbling with the occult.

And with the first Harry Potter film due for release in November, the popularity of witchcraft is set to soar.

The Pagan Federation claims magistrates, doctors, policewomen and lawyers are turning to the occult.

Mum-of-three Christine Quick, 42, of Aberdour, Fife, is a practising witch.

She has her own website –
greenwitch.co.uk – and runs a shop, Mystique Moments, in the village,
selling potions for love, astral travel and eczema.

Christine believes she is a reincarnation of a witch who was drowned in the Forth 1000 years ago.

She said: “They tied her to a pole and waited for the tide to come in. I’ve always hated water.”

Blonde Christine finds it amusing when
people expect her to look like their idea of a witch, complete with
broomstick and pointed hat.

She said: “When people in Aberdour found out what I am, they were shocked. People came up to me and said, ‘You just can’t be a witch – you’re so normal.’ They
expect witches to be bad – but I’m good. In a pub one day, a man
insulted me. The whole place went quiet. They were all waiting for him
to go up in a puff of smoke.”

Christine says an increasing number of her customers are professional women.

She said: “I get a
lot of teachers and nurses. They travel up to 100 miles to visit me
because they can’t be seen to be witches in their own community. There
is still a lot of shame and people do point the finger.”

Latest research shows 41 per cent of Scots do not identify with any religion – up from 29 per cent in 1983.

Last week, the leader of the Catholic Church in England and Wales said Christianity is near to being “vanquished” in Britain.

Cardinal Cormac Murphy-O’Connor, the Archbishop of Westminster, said people had turned to New Age practices rather than to God.

But last night, Andy Norfolk, of the Pagan Federation, said many people have a misguided notion of paganism.

He said: “There are an awful lot of us about. We don’t all look unusual, with hooked noses or warty features. Witchcraft is a serious, nature-based mystery religion in which the natural world is seen to be sacred.”

The federation has 5000 active members, a tenfold growth in the last decade.

Mr Norfolk added: “There are at least 10,000 witches in Scotland.”

On Thursday evening, STV and Grampian
will broadcast This Scotland – Witches of Prestwick, which contains
interviews with witches, including a teacher, business-woman, student
and bio- technician.
source


Orkney, Ayrshire, Cleveland … will the authorities ever learn about child sexual abuse cases?

Those
questions were brought into sharp focus by Jean Rafferty’s powerful,
outspoken piece in The National on the Orkney and Ayrshire sexual abuse
cases, and on the censorship of open discussion about them (When evil visited Orkney, February 27).
It was published on the 25th anniversary of the day nine children, from
four middle-class families, were taken into care on South Ronaldsay,
Orkney, in 1991. This happened after children from a large,
disadvantaged family spoke of an organised sex abuse ring there.
Just like
the eight Ayrshire children removed into care in 1990, they were
returned home: in Ayrshire, after a judge reversed an earlier judge’s
decision, and in Orkney by a sheriff before the evidence was even
tested. It never has been tested. In both cases, allegations included
sadistic ritual and occult practices against children, allegations
much-ridiculed ever since.
The cases
remain important, and I believe the evidence now needs to be reassessed,
for at least three reasons. First, a stream of shocking failures to
protect children from sexual abuse, in the Churches, in care homes, in
private home cellars, through sexual exploitation gangs, by media
celebrities and the powerful, has recently been exposed and continues to
be. This has increased Government and public concern for abused
children and commitment to protect them; and has made society less
inclined to dismiss forms of abuse they previously found unbelievable.
Secondly,
like Rafferty I and others have over 25 years tried to publicise
suggestive evidence that children were indeed in danger. Particularly
over the Orkney case, we have tried to correct untruths – in print, on
the BBC, in documentaries and online – and point up the flaws in the
endlessly recycled and invented theories by supporters of accused
adults, who allege it was just “satanic panic”. We were repeatedly
unsuccessful.
The time is
surely overdue to end a silencing and misrepresentation which sees, for
example, not a single neutral, factual report of either case anywhere
publicly available on the internet. By publishing Rafferty’s article,
The National has stood out for its courage and independence.
Thirdly –
and I believe most important – the verdicts and the myth-making after
these cases have for decades negatively influenced public attitudes,
professional child protection behaviour, and child protection law.
They have
fuelled suspicion of social workers and paediatricians, increased stress
in child protection work, ruled out investigation of possible ritual
organised abuse, strengthened beliefs that children fantasise about
abuse, openly tightened legislation and practice to make it harder to
protect children at serious risk, and eaten into professional courage.
That encourages timidity, a professional watch-my-back mentality, and
nervousness about investigating sexual abuse.
Child sexual
abuse cases have increasingly disappeared off the statutory child
protection radar.Teachers, youth workers, children’s panel members and
social workers still mention Orkney as a reason not to ask a child if
anyone has harmed them sexually, however disturbing or suggestive signs
and behaviours may be. “The Orkney report said we mustn’t – didn’t it?”
(Actually: no it did not.)
An outspoken
Social Work Inspection Agency inquiry report in 2005, into the
scandalous failure to act over many years in Western Isles (Eilean Saar)
despite 222 expressions of concern and numerous case conferences about
three abused and seriously maltreated girls, made this comment. “New
legislation (the Children (Scotland) Act 1995) was designed to protect
children within the context of partnership with their parents. This,
together with the aftermath of the Orkney inquiry (1992) may have
contributed to the prolonged attempts to engage with the family: rather
than to try to remove all three children”.
Did the
authorities behave wisely in the ways they pursued their suspicions in
Orkney? On several counts, no – and today they would surely be less
precipitate, collecting evidence for longer, less obtrusively and in
ways less reliant on the children themselves. Do official mistakes mean
that there was no abuse? Absolutely not: the two issues are separate,
yet they are always conflated.
Was there
suggestive, alarming evidence of organised sexual abuse? Yes, in both
Orkney and Ayrshire. And if the assumed outcomes of the Orkney or
Ayrshire cases are incorrect, then the future lessons drawn from them –
like caution and timidity against sexual abuse, deference and apology to
articulate adults – need revising too.
In this I do
not think we should get tied into angry arguments of great endlessness,
about whether these two cases “really” involved satanist abuse, and if
satanist abuse “really” exists. (It does, but as a cult of human beings –
not evil spirits flying over our homes.) The more important, wider
question is whether there were seriously abused children in these two
places who were failed, who were never protected. And whether there have
been many more children, ever since child protection authorities had
their fingers so badly burned.
Finally,
like the Cleveland Report in 1989, the Orkney Inquiry was commissioned
to examine the conduct of the authorities: not to examine risks to
children. I believe that any future inquiries following high-profile
cases can neither benefit nor protect children at risk, nor be truly
child-centred, unless they include this question in their remit: were
the actual children at the heart of this case abused or not?
How could that not be the most important question to ask?
Sarah Nelson is a research specialist on child sexual abuse issues, based at Edinburgh University The National

Witches `rife in Inverness’  Feb 9th 1998

A Highland minister stunned his flock yesterday by claiming a witches’ coven is active in his parish. 

The Rev John Butcher said a local lawyer and doctor were part of the Satan-worshipping sect. 

He made his stunning claims to a packed congregation at the Ness Bank Church in Inverness. 

Around 250 shocked parishioners listened as the minister warned youngsters to beware of witches and devil- worshippers. 

After his service the retired minister, standing in for a colleague, said:

“I raised the matter
of satanic rites being conducted locally to warn the congregation,
especially younger members, that such practices were totally against the
teachings of the Bible.
I have
absolutely no reason to doubt what I was told about the coven operating
in and around Inverness. I am sure that my informant was being quite
honest with me. 
I had to balance the
risk of unnecessarily giving publicity to these people who dabble in
evil spirits against my desire to ensure other people weren’t enticed
into that kind of mumbo- jumbo. 
The
purpose for choosing this sermon was to make it clear that evil spirits
were not just something found in Biblical times, but that these are
around us today. 
People who dabble in the occult are affected by evil spirits, the antithesis of the true teachings of Our Lord.” Source



If you go down the woods today…beware the Blair Sticks Daily Record Aug 1st 2015

EDINBURGH dog walkers are getting the creeps from pagan festival-style dolls strung up on trees around a campfire.
WATCH VIDEO..

//players.brightcove.net/4221396001/0f4f7561-90a6-49c1-9d85-e357b5f91a26_default/index.html?videoId=4389502501001

SPOOKY wooden dolls left hanging in trees are giving dog walkers the creeps at a popular Scots beauty spot.
The stick figures, like those in horror movie The Blair Witch Project, have appeared in the woods at Cammo Estate near Edinburgh .
There are eight of them, placed in a circle around the remains of a large fire.BLAIR
The stick figures are reminiscent of something from the Blair Witch Project.

One walker said: “At first I thought it was a kid who had done them. But
looking at how everything has been placed within a circle, it looks
like a protection thing. I find it quite spooky and a bit unsettling. It
could be something to do with a pagan ritual.”

Another added: “It might have something to do with midsummer but I don’t feel very comfortable staying around to see what it’s all about.”
Practising witch Pauline Reid, high priestess of the Hearth Coven in Glasgow, said the figures could be linked to the pagan Lammas festival, which takes place today. Daily Record


ALEISTER CROWLEY


UK Column Live – Satanic Ritual Abuse | UK Column

from Blogger http://ift.tt/2aHJdQl
via IFTTT

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *