POLICE STATE SCOTLAND

POLICE STATE SCOTLAND

The Scottish people can have little confidence these days in the probity of its single, unaccountable police force. That in itself is bad enough, but worse still, the force is effectively operating in the pocket of an unelected lawyer whom few Scots have even heard of, Peter Watson of Levy & McRae, who also represents Mr Salmond and Elish Angiolini.  Even Justice Secretary Kenny MacAskill is a former Levy & McRae colleague. The firm boasts that it represents all the major broadcasting media in Scotland and that it employs former senior police officers. Surely no conflict of interest exists, can it?

Given its iron grip on the media, there is little chance of most Scots even hearing anything about grave issues concerning their government, judiciary and police that should be genuine matters of public interest. True freedom of the press and freedom of expression simply do not exist in Scotland. Should you be so bold or unwise as to upset Professor Watson`s private agenda, you are likely to be thrown into prison.

Such is the state of an integral part of the United Kingdom today.

Once again, if the professor considers my comments to be unfair or inaccurate, I should be willing to publish his response on this site.

The Chief Constable, Sir Stephen House, recently knighted for his “services to law and order”, is still unable to answer a very simple question that really must be a matter of public interest.

The Chief Constable of Scotland, a country with the lowest conviction rate for rape in the whole of Europe, still cannot bring himself to describe the basic police actions required in order for him to consider an investigation into rape allegations as “thorough”. 

So far, it would seem that the Chief Constable may not even regard the questioning of alleged identified sexual abusers to be necessary, even when the alleged victim`s complaints are supported by detailed expert witness evidence, including that of the police doctor and by the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority.

What could it possibly be that makes Sir Stephen so reticent?

Perhaps Professor Watson may not approve of his answer. 

Irrespective of the good professor`s opinion, I think that the people of Scotland have a right to know about the views on the subject of rape from the individual they most look to for protection, don`t you?

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