DIRTY DOCTOR

  • also admitted possessing more than 16,000 indecent images
  • Some victims filmed with spy pen, others abused with parents in the room
  • Judge Gareth Hawkesworth tells Bradbury he has ‘never come across such a grotesque betrayal of your Hippocratic oath’
  • CEOP told by Canadian police that Bradbury bought abuse material in 2012
  • However, he was not arrested until December 2013 

A paedophile children’s doctor jailed for 22 years today after he admitted abusing 18 seriously ill boys in his care was known to police almost 18 months before he was arrested, it has emerged.
The former Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre were tipped off by Canadian police in July 2012 that Myles Bradbury, 41, a consultant paediatric haematologist at Addenbrooke’s Hospital in Cambridge, had bought child abuse material online, including films.
However, nothing was done for a further 15 months, and Bradbury – who went on to admit abusing the boys aged between ten and 16 – was not arrested until December 2013. 
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Jailed: Paedophile children's doctor Myles Bradbury who abused 18 sick boys in his care was jailed for 22 years today

Bradbury as he appears in his police mugshot

Jailed: Paedophile children’s doctor Myles Bradbury, pictured right in his police mugshot, who abused 18 sick boys in his care was jailed for 22 years today
Tonight detectives were working to establish how many more children might have been abused by Bradbury, whose actions were described by Judge Gareth Hawkesworth, sitting at Cambridge Crown Court, as ‘one of the worst forms of sexual abuse imaginable’.
The IPCC is investigating the alleged failings by CEOP to react to warnings about Bradbury, while Cambridge University Hospitals, which oversees Addenbrooke’s, has also launched an independent investigation into the abuse he carried out at the hospital.
Married Bradbury, from Herringswell, Suffolk, carried out medical examinations on boys ‘purely for his own sexual gratification’, the court heard.
In some cases he exaggerated the seriousness of the child’s illness to give him more opportunities to abuse particular patients. 
He filmed some of them using secret spy cameras hidden inside pens in his pocket and abused others behind a curtain while their unsuspecting parents were in the room.
In total, he pleaded guilty to 25 offences, including sexual assault, voyeurism and possessing more than 16,000 indecent images, against boys aged between 10 and 16, and was sentenced today.
Some of the victims have since died, without seeing their abuser brought to justice. 
Judge Gareth Hawkesworth said Bradbury’s sentence would be reduced because of his early guilty pleas although ‘some might observe’ that the overwhelming evidence against him meant he had little choice but to admit the offences.
Describing Bradbury as ‘manipulative’, he added: ‘For a doctor to attack children in this way is one of the worst forms of sexual abuse imaginable even if it does not involve physical violence which goes beyond the abuse itself or penetrative activity.’
The judge continued: ‘These boys were all vulnerable and gravely ill.
‘In all my years on the bench, I have never come across a more culpable and grave course of sexual criminality which has involved such a gross and grotesque breach and betrayal of your Hippocratic Oath and trust reposed in you by your patients, their families and colleagues. 
Gadget: A spy pen used by Bradbury to film some of his victims as he carried out examinations on them

Gadget: A spy pen used by Bradbury to film some of his victims as he carried out examinations on them
Hidden: Bradbury's secret spy cameras were hidden in pens the doctor kept in his coat pocket

Hidden: Bradbury’s secret spy cameras were hidden in pens the doctor kept in his coat pocket
‘There are almost too many aggravating factors to list in your prolonged, carefully planned, cruel and persistent campaign of abuse.
‘It is implicit in what you did for your own sexual gratification that you were targeting the most vulnerable, sick children.
‘At the top of this comes the breach of trust.
‘Your colleagues remain guilt ridden at having been unable to detect your offending earlier and having been successfully manipulated by you into ignorance.
‘Your actions have undermined public trust in an already overstretched health service and have caused enormous expense and upheaval in the internal inquiries that inevitably followed your suspension from practice.

‘I’D LIKE TO SEE MYLES BRADBURY AND ASK HIM WHY HE DID WHAT HE DID TO ME’: VICTIM’S DESPAIR

Cambridge Crown Court was told that many of Bradbury’s victims would be isolated from their parents and asked to remove their clothes before the doctor would grope their genitals.  
The depth of the examinations were often increased to meet Bradbury’s sexual needs, not any medical requirement, the court heard. 
One said in a statement read to the court: ‘I am now anxious to go to the doctor because I don’t know who I should trust.
‘I have haemophilia and a pain in my side so I know I should go but I feel disgusted and weird.
‘I didn’t think it would happen to me and I feel angry every time I think about it but also relieved it wasn’t just me but we shouldn’t have to go through it.’
Another said he had regular nightmares, felt stressed and lacked confidence.
‘I’d like to see Myles Bradbury and ask him why he did what he did to me,’ he added.
‘All this almost pales into insignificance set against the trauma, fear and distress you have caused to your victims and their families – considerable psychological harm, I have no doubt – which I suspect will linger with them for the rest of their lives.’ 
‘It is implicit in what you did for your own sexual gratification that you were targeting even the most vulnerable – sick children and what you did to them require careful and significant planning.
‘You bought a camera pen so you could record things without your victims noticing and when the balloon went up you disposed of the hard drive of your laptop, onto which, I infer, many images had been recorded.’
Judge Hawkesworth, who placed Bradbury on the sex offenders register for life and making him subject to a sexual offences prevention order, added that the doctor’s recognition of his deviancy meant the risk he posed to children could be managed. 
The judge continued: ‘Nobody will ever know the precise extent of your activities, thus increasing the agony of those you pretended to treat and their families particularly of deceased children in not knowing whether they too had been abused in this way.’ 
The sentence means Bradbury will never see his daughter, born during the police investigation, unsupervised.
He was sacked from his job earlier this year and will never work as a doctor again, the court heard. 
Bradbury stood open-mouthed as he was led to the cells, and the families of his victims wept.
Bradbury is known to have abused children throughout his five year career at Addenbrooke’s but previously worked in other parts of the country, including Birmingham Children’s Hospital.
Detective Superintendent Gary Ridgway, from Cambridgeshire Police, said his team was now working with police forces and other agencies in various parts of the country to see if his abuse dates back further. 
‘There are a small number of allegations against Bradbury which we are currently investigating,’ he said.
‘These could potentially result in a further trial in the future.’
He said they emerged after police spoke to Bradbury’s previous employers and colleagues and anyone who was treated by him.
He added that one of the most tragic aspects of the case were the families whose children had died without them knowing if Bradbury had abused them too.
He said: ‘We’ve spoken to a small number of families who have children who were treated by Bradbury but have since died.
‘We’ve given them all the information they could need, but sadly we will never know if those children were abused and unfortunately we have no allegations from parents who were given any sign this was going on.
‘It’s one of the most tragic parts of this case.’  
Sentencing: Judge Gareth Hawkesworth (pictured right in this court sketch) described Bradbury (left) as 'manipulative' and said his actions had undermined the public's trust in the 'overstretched health service'

Sentencing: Judge Gareth Hawkesworth (pictured right in this court sketch) described Bradbury (left) as ‘manipulative’ and said his actions had undermined the public’s trust in the ‘overstretched health service’
Encouraging victims to contact police, Mr Ridgway said: ‘It would be naive to assume that we know the full scale of what he did.
‘We are determined to make sure we have given every possible opportunity to victims to come forward, speak about what they experienced and find justice.’
The officer explained that when Bradbury’s home was raided, he had already disposed of his laptop and, although this has since been recovered, he had removed its hard-drive.
‘He made every effort to hide the full scale of his offending,’ Mr Ridgway said.
‘The fact that he did this to his laptop is in itself an indication that we may not yet know everything that he did.’
The NSPCC has set up a helpline for those affected by his crimes and so far at least 54 parents and members of the public have been in touch. Cambridge University Hospitals, which oversees Addenbrooke’s, has also set up a helpline.  
CEOP was tipped off by police in Canada in July 2012 that the paediatrian had been identified as someone who had purchased illegal material.
CEOP reviewed screen shots of the child porn he had viewed and his purchase history but graded the offences as the lowest level 1 and did not pursue the matter.
Nothing was done for another 15 months until CEOP was taken over by the National Crime Agency in October 2013 and Bradbury was arrested two months later.
An NCA spokesman said: ‘We referred Project Spade to the Independent Police Complaints Commission in September.
Arrival: Bradbury arrives at court today in a prison van. He can be seen crouching behind the glass panel

Arrival: Bradbury arrives at court today in a prison van. He can be seen crouching behind the glass panel
‘We do not want to offer any public commentary which could be seen as an attempt to influence either the IPCC’s decision making or any subsequent investigation.”
The IPCC said: ‘We are currently instigating CEOP and looking into the handling of its initial information from Toronto Police.
‘We have more than one team involved in this ongoing investigation looking into all aspects of the Bradbury case and results of this investigation will be staggered over the next few months.’
During the sentencing hearing, John Farmer, prosecuting, said the defendant had a ‘longstanding, unlawful, sexual interest in boys’.
He added: ‘The defendant, through the trust he had acquired, circumvented the procedures and encouraged a number of young patients to see him alone.
‘It was in these circumstance under the guise of legitimate examinations he went entirely beyond the bounds.
‘He took the opportunity of fondling the boys’ genitals and encouraging them to masturbate in his presence and obtain erections for his own personal gratification.
‘On some occasions, when he failed to exclude the parent, he simply carried on behind the curtain behind which the boy had gone to remove his clothes.’
The offences took place over four-and-a-half years, beginning within six months of him taking up his post in 2008 and continuing to the day he was suspended on November 28 last year when the first concerns were raised.
Some 800 families of children cared for by Bradbury were contacted about possible abuse, distracting staff from their main job of caring for the sick. 
At some point, he began using a camera pen in an attempt to gain images of the boys when partially clothed, Mr Farmer added.
Police found 170,425 images on this pen but none of these were classed as indecent.
Doctor: Bradbury, from Herringswell, Suffolk, carried out medical examinations on boys at Addenbrooke's Hospital 'purely for his own sexual gratification', the court heard

Doctor: Bradbury, from Herringswell, Suffolk, carried out medical examinations on boys at Addenbrooke’s Hospital ‘purely for his own sexual gratification’, the court heard
Mr Farmer explained Bradbury was first arrested in December 2013 after police were alerted by Canadian authorities that he had bought a DVD containing indecent images of children as part of Operation Spade.
At that point Cambridgeshire Police were already investigating after concerns were raised about his conduct.
Mr Farmer told Cambridge Crown Court that, although Bradbury was a maverick who had operated outside all accepted norms of his profession, his behaviour had forced fellow specialists to adjust their approach to avoid suspicion.
Mr Farmer added: ‘The gravity of these offences does not lie in the actual extent of the sexual conduct but the grave breach of trust which has had a profoundly undermining effect on these and other patients to the point that the practice of this area of medicine has had to be re-approached to regain the lost trust and put in procedures to avoid not only such conduct but the perception that it might happen.’
Bradbury, who, the court heard, was also involved in church and Scout groups, was described as ‘a man of great charm and persuasiveness’ whom everybody trusted.
Cambridge Crown Court heard that the combined effect of the illnesses suffered by the boys and their treatment can lead to concerns about development in puberty, meaning medics must monitor genital and sexual development.
But the court also heard that Bradbury’s examinations went way beyond the norm, had no medical justification and were carried out purely for his own sexual gratification.
When one victim raised concerns with his mother, she responded: ‘He’s a doctor, it must be necessary.’ 
Mr Farmer said: ‘That was the very image that really protected him from anything other than the most persistent line of complaint.’
Outlining details of some of Bradbury’s victims, the prosecutor said the familiar routine involved isolating them from their parents, asking them to remove their clothes and then groping their genitals.
The depth of the examinations were often increased to meet Bradbury’s sexual needs, not any medical requirement, he added.

‘I HAVE NEVER COME ACROSS SUCH A GROTESQUE BETRAYAL OF YOUR HIPPOCRATIC OATH’: JUDGE GARETH HAWKESWORTH

Damning: Judge Gareth Hawkesworth (pictured) said Bradbury's criminality was 'a gross and grotesque breach' of the Hippocratic Oath

Damning: Judge Gareth Hawkesworth (pictured) said Bradbury’s criminality was ‘a gross and grotesque breach’ of the Hippocratic Oath
Judge Gareth Hawkesworth said Myles Bradbury’s sentence would be reduced because of his early guilty pleas although ‘some might observe’ that the overwhelming evidence against him meant he had little choice but to admit the offences.
Describing Bradbury as ‘manipulative”, he added: ‘For a doctor to attack children in this way is one of the worst forms of sexual abuse imaginable even if it does not involve physical violence which goes beyond the abuse itself or penetrative activity.’
The judge continued: ‘These boys were all vulnerable and gravely ill.
‘In all my years on the bench, I have never come across a more culpable and grave course of sexual criminality which has involved such a gross and grotesque breach and betrayal of your Hippocratic Oath and trust reposed in you by your patients, their families and colleagues. 
‘There are almost too many aggravating factors to list in your prolonged carefully, planned and cruel abuse.
‘It is implicit in what you did for your own sexual gratification that you were targeting the most vulnerable, sick children.
‘At the top of this comes the breach of trust.
‘Your colleagues remain guilt ridden at having been unable to detect your offending earlier and having been successfully manipulated by you into ignorance.
‘Your actions have undermined public trust in an already overstretched health service and have caused enormous expense and upheaval in the internal inquiries that inevitably followed your suspension from practice.
‘All this almost pales into insignificance set against the trauma, fear and distress you have caused to your victims and their families – considerable psychological harm, I have no doubt – which I suspect will linger with them for the rest of their lives.
‘It is implicit in what you did for your own sexual gratification that you were targeting even the most vulnerable – sick children and what you did to them require careful and significant planning.
‘You bought a camera pen so you could record things without your victims noticing and when the balloon went up you disposed of the hard drive of your laptop, onto which, I infer, many images had been recorded.’
Judge Hawkesworth, who placed Bradbury on the sex offenders register for life and making him subject to a sexual offences prevention order, added that the doctor’s recognition of his deviancy meant the risk he posed to children could be managed. 
The judge added: ‘Nobody will ever know the precise extent of your activities, thus increasing the agony of those you pretended to treat and their families particularly of deceased children in not knowing whether they too had been abused in this way.’
The first to raise concerns had suffered from leukaemia from a young age but had been in remission. He told his grandmother who reported Bradbury, leading to his suspension from the hospital.    
Mr Farmer said Bradbury used reverse psychology to keep his victims quiet, saying that they could tell their parents if they liked, but they might prefer it to remain confidential.
He added: ‘This boy showed great wisdom.
‘He could not see why it should be secret so, once in the car, he told his family.
‘By gentle cross-examination, his grandmother got the full story out of him, mulled it over and started the chain that brings the defendant here today.’
Although the sexual contact was not the most severe in nature, the abuse of trust had a serious impact on the victims, Mr Farmer added. 
The mother of another victim said: ‘My son was overjoyed when Dr Bradbury said he would need more appointments. It turned out we were making a bargain with the Devil.
‘When I took my son to his last appointment Bradbury said ‘He’s a big boy now, he doesn’t need you with him.’
Bleak future: Bradbury was sacked from his job earlier this year and will never work as a doctor again, the court heard

Bleak future: Bradbury was sacked from his job earlier this year and will never work as a doctor again, the court heard
‘I smiled and sat as my son followed Bradbury to the treatment room.
‘He pulled a face as if to say don’t leave me on my own. I now know my son did not want to go in alone.’
Mitigating, Bradbury’s barrister, Angela Rafferty, told the court that her client had repressed homosexual tendencies during puberty and this may help explain his crimes.
She added that, unlike some paedophiles, he recognised that what he did was ‘repugnant’ and had never sought to justify his behaviour.
Bradbury graduated from Medical School at the University of Birmingham in 1996.
He held a number of roles before entering the General Medical Council’s specialist register in haematology in 2007.
His first consultancy was in paediatric haematology at Birmingham Children’s Hospital in 2007 but he moved to Addenbrooke’s in Cambridge after a little more than a year.
He continued in that role until a complaint was made about possible abuse by the grandmother of a patient and he was suspended on November 28 2013 – exactly five years after he took up the post.
Ms Rafferty conceded in court that any good Bradbury had done through his job was negated by his abuse.
‘He knows he will not get any understanding or forgiveness because what he did was unforgivable,” she said.
‘His medical life may have done some good at some time but that means nothing now.
‘He accepts that that was the life which allowed him to commit those offences.’  
Speaking after the hearing, Dr Keith McNeil, the chief executive of Cambridge University Hospitals, the authority that runs Addenbrook Hospital told ITV news he was ‘angry’ that hospital staff had not been made aware of the threat posed by Bradbury.
He also said the doctor had ‘manipulated’ his position at the hospital. 
Dr McNeil said: ‘Our thoughts today are with our patients and families who were victims of Bradbury’s shocking and cynical abuse.
‘Today’s sentencing of Bradbury cannot undo the damage he caused but he is finally behind bars and is no longer a risk to vulnerable children.
‘The lengthy sentence shows Bradbury’s abhorrent betrayal and manipulation of his position as a doctor has been fully recognised.’ 
An independent investigation into Bradbury’s actions at the Trust will start later this month.
A spokesman said: ‘The independent investigation into Myles Bradbury and his abuse of patients at this Trust is due to start in December. The wide ranging investigation will include how Bradbury was able to manipulate NHS staff, patients and their families over a number of years.’ 
One legal expert in child sex abuse cases said Addenbrooke’s Hospital could face compensation claims totalling nearly £2 million from victims abused while in the care of the hospital. 
Katherine Yates of Andrew Grove and Co Solicitors said: ‘The effects of sexual abuse in childhood can be serious and long lasting and the employer, Addenbrookes Hospital, is liable for the wrongful acts of their employee, Dr Bradbury.
‘Individual damages can range between £10,000 and £100,000 depending on the nature and severity of the abuse and the psychological aftermath.
‘Expert counselling is often needed to help the victims live with and resolve the issues caused by the abuse they have suffered.
‘Dr Bradbury targeted already vulnerable boys who trusted him as a Doctor. The boys will be entitled to substantial compensation.’
The hospital spokesman said the trust had already been contacted by victims’ solicitors.
It would be naive to assume that we know the full scale of what he did
 DS Gary Ridgway
He said: ‘At the present time we have received correspondence from solicitors acting for a small number of potential claimants; the NHS Litigation Authority is aware.
‘These matters are at an early stage and it would therefore be inappropriate to comment further.’
Renu Daly, a specialist clinical negligence solicitor at Neil Hudgell Solicitors who is representing one of the victims, said the families had not received enough support, and were only given ‘limited information’ about the criminal investigation. 
She added: ‘This has been a traumatic and devastating time for the children and all the families involved.
‘They’re relieved that this has been addressed by the authorities and come to a conclusion today so they can now begin to rebuild their lives and those of their children.
‘This man was trusted in the position of authority that he held and that was disgracefully abused which had a horrendous impact particularly in the lives of those children who have had to return to hospital because of their medical conditions.
‘It must also be bore in mind that some children have sadly passed away because of their condition and for them justice has not been witness today.’ 
Ms Daly added that the families were ‘stressed, upset, angry’ and their children were finding it difficult to attend hospital for further medical treatment for their condition.
The mother of one of Bradbury’s victims said she was ‘pleased’ with the sentence.
She said: ‘In my opinion the sentence will never be enough for what he’s done however I was expecting less than 22 years so I’m pleased with the result.
‘I will have to tell my son when he gets home from school. I’m not sure how he will react, but I’m just glad it’s all over now and he can’t hurt anyone anymore.
‘He will be a grown man when he is released from prison and he will understand better than what Myles did.
‘But that’s a long time in the future, I just hope he serves the full sentence.’  

MISSED OPPORTUNITIES: HOW BLUNDERS BY BRITISH AUTHORITIES ALLOWED PREDATOR DOCTOR TO CONTINUE OFFENDING

Mistakes by the Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre (CEOP) meant Bradbury was left free for 16 months to wage his campaign of abuse.
The doctor bought a DVD in 2005 from Azov Films in Canada. The company advertised on its website ‘just legal’ and ‘naturist’ films but many were clearly illegal – and were bought by paedophiles in over 50 countries around the world.
The site was finally closed down by Toronto police in the summer of 2012 and concerned officers in Canada soon dispatched the names of its customers to authorities in other countries in an operation called Project Spade.
CEOP was handed a list of 2,235 suspected British paedophiles in July 2012 by Canadian police – but did nothing for months.
Canadian police told British authorities about suspected paedophiles including Bradbury as part of a worldwide operation called Project Spade

Canadian police told British authorities about suspected paedophiles including Bradbury as part of a worldwide operation called Project Spade
It was only when the centre was absorbed by the National Crime Agency last November that Bradbury’s name was passed to Suffolk police and his home was raided.
In the intervening time he had continued his abuse and made his trip to the African orphanage.
Among the other suspects named on the list handed over by Canadian authorities was that of teacher Martin Goldberg, who was found dead a day after police first contacted him.
Following the 46-year-old’s death, a search of his house in Shoeburyness, Essex was conducted and 7,257 indecent images of children that he had downloaded from the internet were found.
Three police forces in Britain – Essex, North Yorkshire and North Wales – are under investigation for allegedly failing to act on the child porn intelligence, it emerged earlier this month.
The respectable family man who volunteered at an African orphanage… but secretly targeted vulnerable children
On face value, Dr Myles Bradbury was a respectable professional and an active member of the community.
Living in the pretty and affluent village of Herringswell, Suffolk, the 41-year-old was married and his wife gave birth to their first child, a girl, during the course of the police investigation into his abuse.
He was a church-goer, played a role in the Scout movement and went on a church mission to an orphanage in Swaziland to help children with Aids as recently as 2012.
Respectable: Bradbury (left) was a church-goer, played a role in the Scout movement and went on a church mission to an orphanage in Swaziland to help children with Aids as recently as 2012

Respectable: Bradbury (left) was a church-goer, played a role in the Scout movement and went on a church mission to an orphanage in Swaziland to help children with Aids as recently as 2012
One neighbour said: ‘He seemed like somebody who wanted to do good. Everybody’s in complete shock because he seemed normal and nice.
‘We just feel for his wife who had no idea what was going on.’
Bradbury graduated from Medical School at the University of Birmingham in 1996.
He held a number of roles before entering the General Medical Council’s specialist register in haematology in 2007.
His first consultancy was in paediatric haematology at Birmingham Children’s Hospital in 2007 but he moved to Addenbrooke’s in Cambridge after a little more than a year.
Serious: A photo from a trip to Africa during which Bradbury was left alone with children

Serious: A photo from a trip to Africa during which Bradbury was left alone with children
He continued in that role until a complaint was made about possible abuse by the grandmother of a patient and he was suspended on November 28 2013 – exactly five years after he took up the post.
Hospital bosses have said the consultant paediatric haematologist deliberately targeted the most physically and emotionally vulnerable children in a manner which has fundamentally undermined trust in the medical profession.
Cambridge University Hospital NHS Trust, which employed Bradbury, said his crimes have had a ‘profound and devastating’ impact on patients, their families and staff.
His abuse extended to deliberately misleading patients into thinking their conditions were more serious than they actually were in order to encourage them to attend more appointments than necessary, a statement from the Trust said.
And the trauma forced bereaved parents to relive the pain of losing a child after learning they had been abused.
Impression: One neighbour described Bradbury (pictured) as 'someone who wanted to do good'

Impression: One neighbour described Bradbury (pictured) as ‘someone who wanted to do good’
‘For these parents and families, they cannot ask the painful questions open to others nor receive reassurance,’ a trust spokesman said.
The hospital spokesman said the abuse has had a long-lasting impact.
He added: ‘Almost a year on, the effects of his cold and calculating actions continue to cause anguish and sadly, for many, may do so for years to come.
‘First, and most importantly, there is the effect of his abuse on the young male patients in his care.
‘We should remember that his patients were being treated for cancer and serious blood disorders, which is highly traumatic in itself, especially for children and adolescents.
‘He appears to focus his attention on the most physically and emotionally vulnerable children under his care.
‘It is clear that he betrayed the trust he had built up with these patients over months and years.
‘Many of these patients have lost faith in the medical profession and, for those facing ongoing treatment, are now understandably fearful of returning to hospital.’
He said parents had been persuaded to place their children in a vulnerable position, believing it was in their best interest.
‘This betrayal has shaken their trust in the medical profession at a time when they needed it most,’ the spokesman added. 
The Crown Prosecution Service in the East of England said the offences were ‘one of the worst’ cases of a breach of trust it had ever prosecuted.
Michelle Brown, head of its rape and serious sexual offences unit, said: ‘This paedophile doctor took advantage of his young patients battling serious illness by systematically sexually abusing them. Such cruelty is unimaginable to most of us.
‘The sentence given to Myles Bradbury reflects the seriousness of what he did and the breach of trust involved. We hope that it gives some comfort to those affected to know that he has been held to account for his crimes.’ 
John Cameron, head of the NSPCC helpline, encouraged anybody affected by Bradbury’s crimes to seek help.
Since July, the charity’s counsellors have supported more than 54 parents and other members of the public who were concerned about the case.
He said: ‘At some of the lowest points in their lives, countless families placed their trust and hope in Bradbury.
‘His sexual abuse and perverted voyeurism of extremely vulnerable children was a grotesque betrayal of that trust.’

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