CATH FOX , TROUBLE IN IRELAND

The link below doesn’t now work unfortunately but the name of the orphanage was given. The second link does work however.

“In 1977 John Dwyer, a House-Father at Madonna House, a Sisters of Charity Home in Stillorgan, abducted a nine-year-old in care, Tommy Hayden, taking him to Edinburgh, where he subsequently drowned him in a hotel bath. In January 1978 Dwyer was sentenced to life imprisonment for the murder. The Minister for Health and Social Welfare, Charles Haughey, could not “see that any benefit would be derived from holding a public inquiry”. The opportunities for inquiry and reform were legion.

John Dwyer, aged 25, a house father in an Irish orphanage, who killed a boy of nine who had begged to be adopted by him,-was jailed for life by the High Court in Edinburgh yesterday after pleading guilty to murder. He was said to have drowned Thomas Hayden in his bath while they were staying in the Royal British Hotel, Edinburgh, after running away from a children’s home in Dublin. Mr Dwyer, who was said to have been trained for 10 years with a religious teaching order before becoming a house father, was said to have told the police: “I feel-that Tommy is better off than being taken back to the home where he was unhappy.” After he had drowned the boy, he said he tried to commit suicide by taking a drug overdose. Examination of methods: Health board officials in the Irish Republic are examining their methods of child welfare after the murder of Thomas Hayden (the press Association reports). Mr Haughey, Minister for Health, rejected calls in the’ Irish Parliament last November for a public inquiry.

The link below doesn’t now work unfortunately but the name of the orphanage was given. The second link does work however.

“In 1977 John Dwyer, a House-Father at Madonna House, a Sisters of Charity Home in Stillorgan, abducted a nine-year-old in care, Tommy Hayden, taking him to Edinburgh, where he subsequently drowned him in a hotel bath. In January 1978 Dwyer was sentenced to life imprisonment for the murder. The Minister for Health and Social Welfare, Charles Haughey, could not “see that any benefit would be derived from holding a public inquiry”. The opportunities for inquiry and reform were legion.”

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